Lore Tome: Odin

You have stumbled upon the part of my Hall that is dedicated to storing primary resources for the Norse God Odin (ON: Óðinn)! Here you shall find links to useful texts, as well as information to the relative chapters and passages that concern Odin. These resources are meant for research, but are also suitable for more casual learners. I shall not provide a summary of who he is (and was), but rather will allow the texts to speak for themselves. So please do rummage around, my good friend; there is much to be found here!

GUIDE
  • (#) indicates a reference not by name (indirect).
  • […] provides additional information about a given reference.
  • # indicates a reference that may be of particular interest (Fjorn’s Recommendations).
  • ff. indicates that Odin is consistently present throughout the rest of that reference.
  • For verses: stanza#.line#

IMPORTANT: This page is NOT complete. The nature of this page is such that it will frequently be updated with new resources and references as they become known or available.


PROSE EDDA

In accordance with Anthony Faulkes’ translation:

  • Prologue:
    • 3-5 [as Woden, a king in Asia]
  • Gylfaginning:
    • (8), 11 [birth], 13, 17, 20 [residence], 21 [summary], 23, 24, 26, 29, 31-34, 49-51 [at Baldr’s burial], 54-55 [at Ragnarok].
  • Skáldskaparmál:
    • 59, 61, 62-64 [the mead of poetry], 66-79 [various kennings], (80), 81, 83-87, (89), 90, 95-97, (98), 99-100 [otter’s ransom], 106, (114), 117-119, 121-124, (128, 132-133, 137, 139-140, 145), 151, 156-157, (160).
  • Háttatal:
    • (168, 173, 186, 196-200).

POETIC EDDA

In accordance with Carolyne Larrington’s translation:

  • Vǫluspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress):
    • 18.3
    • 25.1 ff. [in particular, see stanzas 25, 29, and 51]
    • 1.3 [as General]
    • 1.3, 28.4, and 29.7 [as Father of the Slain]
    • 22.3 [as High (Hár)]
    • 29.2 [as Terrible One (Ygg)]
    • 30.1 and 42.2 [as Father of Hosts]
    • 52.1 [as Victory-father]
  • Hávamál (The Sayings of the High One):
    • 98.1
    • 110.1
    • 138.3 [regarding his own hanging]
    • 143.1 [regarding his knowledge of runes]
    • 109.2, 111.6, and 164.1 [as High One (Hávi)].

NOTE: Although Odin is not directly mentioned in much of Hávamál, a great deal of this poem is about him, and thus worth considering in full.

  • Vafþrúðnismál (The Lay of Vafthrudnir):
    • 5.1
    • 52.3, 54.3, 55.5
    • 2.1 [as Father of Hosts]
    • 4.3 and 53.1 [as Father of Men]

NOTE: Odin is a speaker throughout this entire poem, although, like Hávamál, he is not directly mentioned in all of the verses. He also goes by Gagnrad through this poem. Consider this poem in full.

  • Grímnismál (The Lay of Grimnir):
    • prose
    • 3.2
    • 7.3 ff. [in particular, see stanzas 7, 8, 14, 19, 48, and 53]
    • 19.2, 25.1, and 26.1 [as Father of Hosts]
    • 38.2 [as All-father]
    • 46.1 [as Wanderer (Gangleri)]
    • 46.1 and 47.4 [as Mask]
    • 46.2 [as General and Helm-wearer]
    • 46.3 [as Known and Third]
    • 46.4 [as Hell-blind]
    • 47.2 [as High (Hár) and War-merry]
    • 47.3 [as Flame-eyed and Weak-eyed]
    • 47.4 [as Masked One (Grímnir) and Much-wise]
    • 48.1 [as Broad-beard, Broad-hat, Victory-father, and Wanderer]
    • 48.2 [as All-father, Burden-god, and Father of the Slain]
    • 49.6 [as Equal-high]
    • 53.1 and 54.1 [as Terrible One (Ygg)]
  • Skírnismál (The Lay of Skirnir):
    • 21.1, 22.2, 33.1
  • Hárbarðsljóð (The Lay of Harbard):
    • 9.2, 24.3, 56.5

NOTE: Odin is disguised as a man named Harbard throughout this poem. Consider it in full.

  • Lokasenna (The Flyting of Loki):
    • prose, 9.1 [regarding a blood-bond between Odin and Loki], 22.1, 45.3, 58.4
  • Helgakviða Hundingsbana I (The First Lay of Helgi the Hunding-Slayer):
    • 12.3
    • 38.2 [as All-father]
  • Helgakviða Hundingsbana II (The Second Lay of Helgi the Hunding-Slayer):
    • prose
    • 34.3 [regarding Odin’s causing of misfortune by his casting of runes]
    • 43.2
    • 50.2
  • Reginsmál (The Lay of Regin):
    • prose [Otter’s ransom]
  • Sigrdrífumál (The Lay of Sigrdrifa):
    • 2.3 [a reference to Odin’s casting of sleep-runes on Brynhild]
    • prose
  • Guðrúnarkviða I (The First Lay of Gudrun):
    • 19.2
  • Helreið Brynhildar (Brynhild’s Ride to Hel):
    • 8.4 [regarding why Odin was mad with Brynhild]
  • Oddrúnargrátr (The Lament of Oddrun):
    • 16.2
  • Atlakviða (The Lay of Atli):
    • 30.3 [as Victory-god (Sígtýr)].
  • Baldrs draumar (Baldr’s Dreams):
    • 2.1
    • 3.3 [referred to as the “father of magic” in 3.2]
    • 4.1 [regarding Odin’s revival spell, in which he brings back to life a Seeress]
    • 8.4 ff.
    • 6.1 and 13.1 [as Way-tame (Vegtam)]
  • Hyndluljóð (The Lay of Hyndla):
    • 2.1, 44.4
  • Vǫluspá (from Hauksbók):
    • 18.3, 30.1, 40.4, 47.2, 49.3
    • 1.3 [as Woe-father]
    • 27.3 [as High (Hár)]
    • 34.2 [as Father of Hosts]

FORNALDARSÖGUR (Sagas of the Ancient Age)

  • Vǫlsunga saga (The Saga of the Volsungs):
    • Chapter 1
    • Chapter 2
    • Chapter 3 [thrusts Gram (sword) into Barnstock (tree)]
    • Chapter 8 [raven brings leaf to heal someone]
    • Chapter 10
    • Chapter 11 [breaks sword in battle with his spear]
    • Chapter 12
    • Chapter 13 [gives Sigurd a horse]
    • Chapter 14 [Otter’s ransom]
    • Chapter 17 [as Feng (Fengr), Fjolnir (Fjǫlnir), and Hnikar (Hnikarr)]
    • Chapter 18 [advises Sigurd about Fafnir]
    • Chapter 21 [punishes Brynhild and carves runes as Hropt]
    • Chapter 44
  • Hrólfs saga kraka (The Saga of Hrolf Kraki):
    • Chapter 4
    • Chapter 26 [as Hrani; tests Hrolf’s men]
    • Chapter 30 [as Hrani; tests Hrolf]
    • Chapter 33

In accordance with Seven Viking Romances, translated by Hermann Pálsson and Paul Edwards:

  • Ǫrvar-Odds saga (The Saga of Arrow-Odd):
    • Chapter 14 [in verse]
    • Chapter 17 [regarding conversion]
    • Chapter 23
    • Chapter 29 [in verse]
    • Chapters 19-23 [as Red-beard]
    • Chapters 24 and 29 [as Jolf]
  • Gautreks saga (The Saga of King Gautrek):
    • Chapter 1
    • Chapter 2
    • Chapter 7 [as himself in judgement]
    • Chapters  4 and 7 [as Grani Horsehair]
  • Hálfdanar saga Eysteinssonar (The Saga of Halfdan Eysteinsson):
    • Chapter 1 [in genealogy].
  • Bósa saga ok Herrauðs (The Saga of Bosi and Herraud):
    • Chapter 1 [in genealogy]
    • Chapter 12 [regarding a toast in his name]
  • Egils saga einhenda ok Ásmundar berserkjabana (The Saga of Egil One-hand and Asmund Berserker-slayer):
    • Chapter 8 [regarding a sacrifice]
    • Chapter 13 [as the Prince of Darkness]
  • Þorsteins þáttr bæjarmagns (The Tale of Thorstein Mansion-might):
    • Chapter 3 [regarding an eagle thought to have been sent by Odin]
    • Chapters 9-10 [regarding a toast in his name and a servant-boy sent by Odin to a certain man].

In accordance with The Sagas of Ragnar Lodbrok, translated by Ben Waggoner:

  • The Saga of Ragnar Lodbrok:
    • Chapter 9 [in verse]
    • Chapter 10 [in verse]
  • Sǫgubrot:
    • Chapter 7 ff. [as Bruni(?)].
  • The Tale of Ragnar’s Sons:
    • Chapter 5 [in verse].
  • Krákumál:
    • 12.7 [as Svolnir]
    • 25.3 [as Baldr’s Father, Fjolnir, and Vidrir]
    • 27.5 [as Vidrir (in a reference to his spear) and Herjan]

NOTE: I have not yet searched through all of the Fornaldarsögur, having only collected what I could with the collection I already have in my personal library. But no worries! I shall look through more in the future and add them at that time.

HEIMSKRINGLA (Sagas of Kings)

In accordance with Heimskringla I, translated by Alison Finlay and Anthony Faulkes:

  • Ynglinga saga (The Saga of the Ynglings):
    • Chapters 2-9 [as a mortal chieftain]
    • Chapter 12 [as Odin the Old]
    • Chapter 25 [a king sacrifices his son to Odin in exchange for prolonged life]
    • Chapter 43 [regarding a sacrifice]
  • Hákonar saga góða (The Saga of Hakon the Good):
    • Chapters 14 and 17 [regarding  toast in his name].
  • Ólafs saga Tryggvassonar (The Saga of Olaf Tryggvason):
    • Chapter 27 [regarding a sacrifice and ravens]
    • Chapter 64 [as a hooded guest]

NOTE: There are several poetic references to Odin scattered throughout Heimskringla. I have yet to include them all, but plan to do this in the future.

ÍSLENDINGASÖGUR (Sagas of Icelanders)

  • Bárðar saga Snæfelsáss (Bard’s Saga):
    • Chapter 18 [briefly as Raudgrani].
  • Flóamanna saga (The Saga of the People of Floi):
    • Chapter 1 [in genealogy].

REMEMBER: This page is NOT complete. I have only added what I could from my personal library, but I will be taking time in the future to gather more resources for this page. However, this should be enough to get the project started!

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